Introduction to Testing in Java

richardwarburton

Welcome to this review of the Pluralsight course Introduction to Testing in Java by Richard Warburton.

Richard is an empirical technologist and solver of deep-dive technical problems and works independently as a Software Engineer and Trainer. He’s the author of Java 8 Lambdas and a trainer on java8training.com.

He’s a leader in the London Java Community, has a set on the JCP and runs Java Hackdays, and has given talks at Devoxx, JavaOne, JFokus, Geecon, Oredev, JAX London, and Codemotion. He obtained a PhD in Computer Science from The University of Warwick.

Also in this series:

Part 1 – Introduction
Part 2 – Testing Code
Part 3 – Writing Good Tests
Part 4 – Test Driven Development
Part 5 – Dependencies

Introduction – Why Automate Testing?

Why should we automate testing? Richard uses the analogy of the leaning tower of Pisa, which was in danger of falling over. It cost $25 million just to plan out how to fix it.

It’s extremely expensive to fix things that are already in use. But if we can find problems earlier fixing them becomes a lot cheaper.

Richard lists five things that good software testing ensures:

– Achieves stakeholder goals
– Meets functional requirements
– Correctly handles corner cases
– Performance
– Usability

This course will focus on the first three of these goals.

The Testing Hierarchy

Richard breaks down the different types of tests: Unit, Aggregate and System.

Unit tests for for testing a single unit of functionality
Aggregate tests (sometimes called integration tests) ask does a component do its job correctly?
System or “End to End” tests check that the application meets its requirements

Course Outline & Summary

Richard introduces the modules that will follow:

– Testing Code
– Writing Good Tests
– Introducing TDD
– Building Classes from Tests
– Dependencies
– Going Outside-In

Continue to Part 2 – Testing Code

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